16 9 / 2014

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematics and Traditional Cuisine

The mathematics of Pasta: A process analysis to find unity, formulas and ways to express structure mathematics of pasta shapes, by their mathematical and geometric properties.
See more at: The Maths of Pasta by George L. Legendre.

Image: 

  • 'Pasta By Design' - Created by a team of designers, ‘Pasta by Design’ book reveals the hidden mathematical beauty of pasta: its geometrical shapes and surfaces are explained by mathematical formulae, drawings and illustrations.
  • Animated gifs - From video: The traditional pasta making techniques used at Della Terra Pasta by Chris Becker [Video] - shared at here.

Types of Pasta in the post (From left to right):  Agnolotti - Tortellini - Saccottini - Sagne Incannulate - Pappardelle.

(via sagansense)

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16 9 / 2014

explore-blog:

From illustrator Simona Ciarolo, a sweet celebration of connection and inner softness in a culture that encourages hard individualism and prickly exteriors – or, what a baby cactus can teach us about empathy, free will, and the art of finding one’s tribe 

explore-blog:

From illustrator Simona Ciarolo, a sweet celebration of connection and inner softness in a culture that encourages hard individualism and prickly exteriors – or, what a baby cactus can teach us about empathy, free will, and the art of finding one’s tribe 

Permalink 169 notes

15 9 / 2014

"

For [Sesame Street’s] 44th season on the air, Cookie Monster was essentially repurposed into a full-time, walking, talking, googly-eyed vehicle for a set of intensely fashionable ideas about psychology and success. The blue Muppet was now … a “poster child for someone needing to master self-regulation skills.”

For the duration of the new season, Cookie [Monster] lusted after his favorite treat as much as ever. But when it came to acting on his desires, he sang, quite literally, a different tune: “Me want it, but me wait.” In sketch after sketch, song after song, he struggled mightily with self-control, strained to keep his focus on long-term goals, and collected mental strategies to delay gratification.

[…]

As the capacity to delay gratification seems more and more like destiny, we are becoming a culture obsessed with self-regulation.

Which lends a kind of overpowering weight to the question: If self-control is so important, how are we supposed to achieve it?

"

Social psychologist David DeSteno, who studies such fascinating things as the interplay of good and evil in each of us and the psychology of trust, examines the new emotional science of self-regulation, looking at the implications of the famous “marshmallow test” – one of the 20th century’s most famous psychology experiments, testing how children’s ability to delay gratification correlates with their capacity for success as adults, an  essential component of grit, which we now know is a greater predictor of success than IQ

DeSteno’s full essay is well worth reading.

(via explore-blog)

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15 9 / 2014

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15 9 / 2014

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15 9 / 2014

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15 9 / 2014

wired:

Christopher Columbus likely used this map as he planned his first voyage across the Atlantic in 1492 — and a team of researchers is using multispectral imaging to uncover the hidden text. 
MORE. 

wired:

Christopher Columbus likely used this map as he planned his first voyage across the Atlantic in 1492 — and a team of researchers is using multispectral imaging to uncover the hidden text. 

MORE

(Source: Wired)

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15 9 / 2014

"When “No” is your default, the things that fight their way to “Yes” have a deeper value and meaning. They not only have to earn their place, they have to maintain their worth to keep it. “Yes” is important. “Yes” means that something really matters to me. But, this is only the case — and I would argue only can be the case — when “Yes” is not easy and “No” is the default."

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15 9 / 2014

"There is nothing more beautiful than seeing a person being themselves. Imagine going through your day being unapologetically you."

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14 9 / 2014

"There’s power in the touch of another person’s hand. We acknowledge it in little ways, all the time. There’s a reason human beings shake hands, hold hands, slap hands, bump hands. It comes from our very earliest memories, when we all come into the world blinded by light and color, deafened by riotous sound, flailing in a suddenly cavernous space without any way of orienting ourselves, shuddering with cold, emptied with hunger, and justifiably frightened and confused. And what changes that first horror, that original state of terror? The touch of another person’s hands. Hands that wrap us in warmth, that hold us close. Hands that guide us to shelter, to comfort, to food. Hands that hold and touch and reassure us through our very first crisis, and guide us into our very first shelter from pain. The first thing we ever learn is that the touch of someone else’s hand can ease pain and make things better. That’s power. That’s power so fundamental that most people never even realize it exists."

Jim Butcher, Skin Game (via wordsnquotes)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

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