20 10 / 2014

"If it can be destroyed by the truth, it deserves to be destroyed by the truth."

Carl Sagan  (via nofatnowhip)

(Source: stxxz.us, via lostinamerica)

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20 10 / 2014

explore-blog:

The Hummingbird Effect – Steven Johnson on how Galileo invented time and sparked a complex chain of influences that sparked the Industrial Revolution, catalyzed the Information Age, and gave rise to the modern tyranny of the clock that dictates the rhythms of our daily lives.

explore-blog:

The Hummingbird EffectSteven Johnson on how Galileo invented time and sparked a complex chain of influences that sparked the Industrial Revolution, catalyzed the Information Age, and gave rise to the modern tyranny of the clock that dictates the rhythms of our daily lives.

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20 10 / 2014

zerostatereflex:

Man Creates The First Ever Leaf That Turns Light and Water Into Oxygen

"If humanity hopes to realize its dreams of exploring the stars, we’re going to need to find ways to recreate life on Earth aboard a spaceship. Simply stockpiling enough vital supplies isn’t going to cut it, which is what led Julian Melchiorri, a student at the Royal College of Art, to create an artificial biological leaf that produces oxygen just like the ones on our home planet do."

YES. Let’s get off this planet, shall we? 

Is this real?

(via sagansense)

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20 10 / 2014

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19 10 / 2014

explore-blog:

Italo Calvino was offered the 1985–1986 term of the prestigious Charles Eliot Norton Professorship of Poetry at Harvard. He died weeks before he was scheduled to deliver his lectures, but working on them, his wife recalls, was the obsession of his final months. 
Calvino’s manuscripts for the lectures, in which he looks back on “the millennium of the book” and peers forward into what the future might hold for “the expressive, cognitive, and imaginative possibilities” of language and literature, were his last legacy. 
Here is Calvino’s enduring wisdom from the first lecture, a magnificent meditation on lightness. 

explore-blog:

Italo Calvino was offered the 1985–1986 term of the prestigious Charles Eliot Norton Professorship of Poetry at Harvard. He died weeks before he was scheduled to deliver his lectures, but working on them, his wife recalls, was the obsession of his final months.

Calvino’s manuscripts for the lectures, in which he looks back on “the millennium of the book” and peers forward into what the future might hold for “the expressive, cognitive, and imaginative possibilities” of language and literature, were his last legacy. 

Here is Calvino’s enduring wisdom from the first lecture, a magnificent meditation on lightness

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19 10 / 2014

newyorker:

image

Emily Nussbaum on television shows with “morally sketchy” heroines:

“For some viewers, the idea that her flaws were there on purpose, that they were the whole point, remains hard to swallow. But ‘relatability’ is a trap—it’s a cage for artistic ambition. When it comes to role…

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19 10 / 2014

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19 10 / 2014

"There are two questions a man must ask himself: The first is Where am I going? and the second is Who will go with me? If you ever get these questions in the wrong order you are in trouble."

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19 10 / 2014

"I asked my ex, now good friend, if she would ever have an open relationship and she said, “No, I don’t think I could do that” then after a pause and a smile, “but what about love affair friendships?” She went on to describe an impenetrable fortress of female friendship, her own group of best mates who’d known each other since school and had supported and loved each other through almost all of their lifetimes. They sounded far more bonded to, and in love with one another, than their respective husbands. It struck me that we don’t have the language to reflect the diversity and breadth of connections we experience. Why is sex the thing we tend to define a relationship by, when in fact it can be simple casual fun without a deep emotional transaction? Why do we say “just friends” when, for some of us, a friendship goes deeper? Can we define a new currency of commitment that celebrates and values this? Instead of having multiple confusing interpretations of the same word, could we have different words? What if we viewed our relationships as a pyramid structure with our primary partner at the top and a host of lovers, friends, spiritual soul mates, colleagues, and acquaintances beneath that?"

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19 10 / 2014

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